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The Hemsleys: How to stay balanced when travelling

How do you stay balanced when your feet are barely touching the ground? Melissa and Jasmine Hemsley believe it’s all about the right mindset, coupled with some speedy prep, wherever you are in the world

by Psychologies

One - The big sleep

‘Often we work in the evenings and sometimes it’s just not possible to unwind with yoga or meditation because we get home so late. It’s very hard to switch off, especially if you are managing a huge workload. We all know that it doesn’t stop when you get home – you have to cram in errands, put on a load of washing, or make lunch for the next day. On days like that, when you’re over-tired and everything is full-on, if you find yourself with just half an hour, make one decision – go to bed earlier. Use that time for sleeping, not doing. When you wake, better-rested, you can tackle the next day in the right frame of mind.’ Melissa

Two - Don't fight it

‘If you can’t get into bed early, make the decision to shut down technology so you are a bit less stressed. Then you’re not trying to do the washing, cooking and checking your emails. I know I’m guilty of it too, and then I’m doing six things at once, and it’s getting later and later. When you feel your heart racing, that’s your body telling you you’re in fight-or-flight mode, and it really is time to stop. All the little things can always wait. We just need to remind ourselves of that.’ Melissa

Three - First-class kit

‘We make up our own in-flight kits. Mine always contains something to hydrate my skin and we both love Alexandra Soveral’s products [read all about Melissa and Jasmine’s green and natural beauty routine next month]. I always pack a small pot of coconut oil to add to my food, herbal teabags, eco wipes for my hands and some healthy satisfying snacks – such as our tahini fudge or a paradise bar, and Jas likes roasted chickpeas with spices and coconut.’ Melissa

Four - Balmy nights

‘We both love eye masks, at home and away, as it’s so important to sleep in complete darkness. Two of my favourite bedtime products are 1001 Remedies Good Night Sleep Relaxing Balm, £29, and when I’m travelling, Tata Harper Aromatic Bedtime Treatment, £48, which is great for sending sleepy signals to your brain that you then always associate with bedtime.’ Jasmine

Five - Instant hit

‘It’s good to have something nutrient-rich to eat on the plane, as air travel depletes your body. We often take our pesto sauce, to add extra zing if we’ve packed a hearty salad. We also pack whole fruit and veg. And we always love our quinoa kettle porridge. It’s a nourishing instant porridge. You put dry ingredients – quinoa, dessicated coconut and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger – into a stainless-steel food container, and then just ask for boiling water to be added to it on the flight. You can add anything you want to it – grated apple is yummy, or sliced apricots. It cooks without the lid on in a few minutes, and then you can open it and enjoy a hearty hot meal on the plane.’ Melissa

Six - Wrap up

‘Staying warm on a long-haul flight is crucial – we take a haramaki with us. They’re Japanese tummy wraps that keep the kidneys warm and supported, and also stop shivers setting in if you fall asleep and your body temperature drops on the plane.’ Jasmine

Seven - Flight mode

'Our meditation teacher, Gary Gorrow, taught us to meditate before and during flights. If my mind is already wandering, then I just take five or 10 minutes of quiet time and observe my thoughts. I let my thoughts come up and dump themselves and it refreshes my brain. Any journey offers a great way to find time, so it’s become a habit for me now. I also have guided meditations on my phone which are great for long plane journeys.’ Jasmine

Eight - Reset and rest

‘Combat jet lag by staying well-hydrated, getting lots of daylight when you land, and stick to the time zone you’re in – so if you land at lunchtime, have a meal and go to a park. If you land at dinner time, eat lightly, go for a stroll, then take a bath and go to bed. Don’t overeat and go to bed too full, or over-stimulate yourself before bed. Try not to stay up, fiddling with your gadgets and watching TV – it will only send wake-up signals to your brain.’ Melissa

Find recipes and foodie inspiration online at the #360me channel at lifelabs.psychologies.co.uk.

Photograph: Nicholas Hopper

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