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Book review: The Age Of Miracles

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker

Time is not something that we usually think twice about. It’s a marker, a concept, something abstract that can drag by or go in the blink of an eye. But what would happen if time started expanding? If days stretched for whole weeks, and weeks lasted months?

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker

Time is not something that we usually think twice about. It’s a marker, a concept, something abstract that can drag by or go in the blink of an eye. But what would happen if time started expanding? If days stretched for whole weeks, and weeks lasted months?

Told from the point of view of only child Juliet, a startlingly insightful 11-year-old, we bear witness to the diverse ways humans deal with this sudden expanse of time.

While the government urges people to keep to the traditional 24-hour clock, those who reject this, keeping in sync with the earth’s natural cycle, are shunned – Juliet’s parents’ relationship begins to break down from the stress, her mother succumbs to ‘gravity sickness’ with horrific consequences and, with reduced natural light, food begins to run out.

Against this backdrop, Juliet strives to get on with becoming a teenage girl. A quietly powerful and original novel. Emma Herdman